It’s been just over a week since the horrific atrocity at the Manchester arena. To say it hit us hard is an understatement. ROR was born and bred in the city. We live here, socialise here and call this place our home. We’ve always been proud of our northern roots, but non more so than right now. Over the past week, we’ve seen Mancunians from all over the city rise up against terror. Whether it’s been raising money for the victims and their families, leaving flowers in St Ann’s Square or by just offering a cuppa and a chat; we’ve all found some way to help each other.

 

 

The phenomenal response to this attack on our city has evolved in this short time. Just one day after the horrific events, Mancunians sent a clear message to the people who wanted to hurt our city. Street art started to appear on many of the walls in the city’s Northern Quarter. The bee, which is the symbol for Manchester (due to our part in the industrial revolution, and often being described as busy worker bees) has become more symbolic than ever. It’s popping up all around the city as a reminder of our strong past, and togetherness. 

 
  

One of the ways to show our support and raise awareness has been to get a bee tattoo for £50, with all proceeds going to the Manchester emergency fund, which helps the victims families. People queued for over 12 hours at one city centre store, and the total amount raised so far is well over £15.000! People of all ages, from all walks of life, came together to get a permanent reminder of the strength of our city. One lady who was 71, said she was honoured to get her very first tattoo in aid of such an important cause. 

 

 

St Ann’s Square has been the focal point of the memorial for the victims of the Manchester arena attack. Flowers as far as the eye can see, have been left by people paying their respects. The square has been packed full of people since last Monday, and has become a place for people to talk, and comfort one another. From one young Muslim blogger offering free hugs, to renditions of ‘Don’t Look Back In Anger’, it’s a place where we can all come together and process what has happened. There’s no doubt that this has knocked us for six. It’s brought the fight against terror to our door step. Some people describe Manchester as the ‘village of the north’, and it’s true. It’s a small, yet strong city, where people know each other and will always lend a helping hand. We’ve always been friendly and welcoming, but this past week has surpassed everyone’s expectations of just how great Manchester really is. We send our deepest sympathies for anyone who has been caught up in this nightmare, but we will recover and get through this together.

 

You can donate to the Manchester Emergency Fund Here